Analysis: NHS performance statistics up to and including February 2017

SAVE ITEM

13 / 04 / 2017

This briefing provides an overview of the key findings from the latest set of NHS performance data and some relevant points of comparison.

Headline results

  • A&E attendances in the first 11 months of 2016/17 are 2.5 per cent higher in major (type 1) units and 2.4 per cent higher overall compared to same period in 2015/16.
  • Emergency admissions via type 1 A&Es are up 3.1 per cent between April 2016 and February 2017, compared to the same period in 2015/16.
  • Trolley waits are 54.7 per cent higher to date in 2016-17 compared to the same period in 2015/16. There have been 3,225 trolley waits in excess of 12 hours so far in 2016/17, compared to 664 across the same 11 months of 2015/16. 
  • The proportion of delayed days that are deemed to be the responsibility of social care organisations has increased from 25.9 to 34.3 per cent between April 2013 to February 2014 and April 2016 to February 2017.
  • While the proportion of people seen within two weeks of an urgent GP referral for suspected cancer was the second highest of the year (95.4 per cent), only 79.8 per cent of patients received their first cancer treatment within two months of GP referral in February.
  • Only 89.8 per cent of the 3.664m patients on the waiting list had been waiting less than 18 weeks. The number waiting longer than 52 weeks (1,583) increased to its highest number since August 2012 (2,054).
  • A new high point for the early intervention in psychosis target has been achieved, with 80.20 per cent of service users with their first episode of psychosis starting treatment within two weeks of referral.
  • The number of patients waiting in excess of six weeks for a diagnostic test has fallen to a more than three year low in February, at 9,241.
View the stats for November and December 2016.

Latest Tweets

Latest Blog Post

How commissioners and providers can improve pain management for dying people at home | Tracey Bleakley

22 / 5 / 2017 12.46pm

Tracey Bleakley, chief executive of Hospice UK, outlines how commissioners and service providers can help improve pain management for dying people at home.

Why Register?

Great reasons to register with NHS Confederation

  • Personalise your website
    Select topics of interest for recommended content
  • Bookmark useful pages
    Quickly and easily find what you need
  • Comment and recommend
    Rate and share content with colleagues
  • Plus, for our members
    Access member-only resources and tailor member benefits and services

Sounds great, what next?

Register Now

Not now, I will register later

Log In

To book events and access member only content you need to register with us.  This only takes a moment via our registration page. If you have already registered login using your email address and password below.